Well: Yes and No.  Yes, your bankruptcy discharge can be reversed, though “revoked” is the better word to use here. However, this is rare and will only happen under certain conditions, and the conditions that are under your complete control. For example a party may dispute your debt from being discharged on the grounds that you committed fraud, failed to follow court orders, or were not completely honest when you prepared your bankruptcy paperwork. Any party who is directly involved in the process, including your creditors, the trustee assigned to your case, and the United States trustee might dispute your bankruptcy.

The best defenses against having your discharge revoked are to hire an experienced trustworthy attorney, be entirely honest with them about your assets, and ask them questions before making decisions that might impact your bankruptcy. Make sure you open your mail and stay in contact with your attorney so that you are informed of and can follow any court orders that have been put in place. If you have done all of these things, you have no reason to worry about your discharge being revoked. If you are worried that you may have committed fraud or failed to disclose information about your assets, contact your attorney right away and discuss the situation with them to find out what your options are.

There are also time limits for when someone can file a request to have your discharge reversed. Depending on which chapter of bankruptcy you have filed, the deadline is generally a year after your case was discharged, or a year after the case was closed. If the court revokes your bankruptcy discharge, you’ll remain liable for any previously discharged debts. Also, if you committed fraud or otherwise abused the bankruptcy system, you might have to pay fines, forfeit assets, or face criminal prosecution.  None of that sounds enjoyable, so it’s always best to consult with your attorney about your concerns and make sure you disclose everything up front.

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